Leaving Societal Norms Behind

Consent

Consent

What is the #1 thing when it comes to successful polyamorous relationships?

CONSENT

CONSENT

CONSENT

                                           CONSENT

                                                      CONSENT

CONSENT

CONSENT

CONSENT

 

Yep! You guessed it…it’s Consent!

I’m sorry, but if your relationships are not consensual, meaning:

  • Everyone involved doesn’t know.
  • You’re lying about things to your partner(s).
  • You act without asking or don’t listen to people when they say No or Stop.

It is NOT polyamory!

Find out more about why consent is so important – when it comes to relationships of any kind – by reading through our articles that cover multiple topics involving Consent.

 

“Silence does not mean yes. No can be thought and felt but never said. It can be screamed silently on the inside. It can be in the wordless stone of a clenched fist, fingernails digging into palm. Her lips sealed. Her eyes closed. His body just taking, never asking, never taught to question silence.”

― Amy Reed, The Nowhere Girls

“Tell her that her body belongs to her and her alone, that she should never feel the need to say yes to something she does not want, or something she feels pressured to do. Teach her that saying no when no feels right is something to be proud of.”

― Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions

“Consent can be sexy! Reframing a question as part of seduction/foreplay allows couples to be clear about what kind of sexual activity is allowed while keeping the mood alive. Saying, “I’m wondering what it would be like to kiss you” in a soft, seductive tone can feel easier (and hotter) in a steamy moment than, “Do you mind if I kiss you?” 

― Elle Chase, Curvy Girl Sex: 101 Body-Positive Positions to Empower Your Sex Life

“This is what consent culture means. It means expecting more — demanding more. It means treating one another as complex human beings with agency and desire, not just once, but continually. It means adjusting our ideas of dating and sexuality beyond the process of prying a grudging “yes” out of another human being. Ideally you want them to say it again, and again, and mean it every time. Not just because it’s hotter that way, although it absolutely is; consent doesn’t have to be sexy to be centrally important. But because when you get down to it, sexuality should not be about arguing over what you can get away with and still call consensual.”

― Laurie Penny